Organisational Readiness: Technology Enabled Care Services

Having previously worked in the public sector I have personally been guilty of procuring technologies without firstly giving a lot of consideration as to how ready the organisation was to use the technologies effectively. For example, does the organisation have the right skills, resource, capacity or information systems to benefit from such technologies and measure service impact?

Not considering organisational readiness appropriately means that it is likely the technologies will not meet their intended purpose, and neither will expected benefits be realised.

This oversight is something that happens regularly, especially within the public sector. We have all witnessed it with failed local and regional technology related projects, as well as national multi-million pound IT projects, for example.

I once knew someone who bought £500K of telecare ‘boxes’ for a local authority. After 6 months the ‘boxes’ were still in a store; no one knew how to deploy and use the contents of the ‘boxes’!

On a national or even international scale, the cost of investing in technologies without ever realising their full potential or improving care to patients and users must be colossal. This is a complete waste of public funds.

Organisational readiness: For too long the focus has been on the provider and supplier end of the market; whilst this has its place, time and consideration has to equally be given to the planning and commissioning end of the market. It is in the long term interest of good providers and suppliers of technology to provide their products, solutions and services into organisations that are ready.

Not only should organisations assess their own readiness prior to committing to acquiring technologies, there is a role also for providers and suppliers to help ensure organisations are ready.

So how can organisations make sure they are ready before taking a leap into the world of technology enabled care services? This is very important now that technologies are playing more of a role in health and social care provision.

Good News: We are glad to inform you that CECOPS has some new developments which will help!

First end-to-end outcome-based International Code of Practice for Planning, Commissioning and Providing Technology Enabled Care Services

We have just developed the first ever end-to-end outcome-based International Code of Practice for Planning, Commissioning and Providing Technology Enabled Care Services. Following the sequential steps set out within this Code will help to ensure organisations are ready before engaging with technology enabled care services. It will also help to ensure any service implemented results in the best possible outcomes, and that the service is innovative and sustainable.

The new CECOPS Code will be available within the next couple of weeks. Please get in touch if you would like to be informed when it becomes available.

To supplement the Code, CECOPS has also developed a self-evaluation and continuous improvement tool for both planning and commissioning TECS, as well as service provision. This tool can also help with determining organisational readiness and implementing new services. There is a free trial available so you can see how it works. Details can be downloaded HERE

“..this is more than a Code of Practice; it is a map, a guide and a chaperone. It is thought provoking and a source of inspiration.”  Roy Lilley, Health expert and analyst.

Brian Donnelly

Get in touch: If you would like to discuss any of the above issues please get in touch.

E: brian@cecops.org.uk | +44 (0) 7511 667 330 | T: +44 (0) 1494 863398 | www.cecops.org.uk

THE AUTHOR

Brian Donnelly

Chief Executive - CECOPS

Brian has over 20 years’ experience in Health and Social Care, working at both strategic and operational level. His experience spans across the public, private and third sectors (social enterprises). He is qualified in Procurement, Management Studies, and Project Management and holds an MSc in Health & Social Care (with Distinction). Brian is recognised nationally and internationally for his work on standards on a range of assistive technology related services. He is committed to improving quality, safety and performance in health and social care, so that people using services receive good care and support.

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